Salton Winery – Started by Seven Brothers in Brazil with a Link to Scotland

(June 2018) Salton Winery is considered to be the oldest wineries in Brazil, and is also one of the largest. Established by seven brothers in 1910 in the city of Bento Gonçalves, Salton specializes in Brazilian sparkling wine production, but also produces still wines as well as tea. After my visit here at the end of June, where I met with Gregorio Salton, a member of the 4th generation of the family, I left truly impressed with all of the investments they have made in quality control, including ISO9000 and 14000 certifications for the winery.

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Entrance to Salton Winery in Southern Brazil

About Salton Winery

As is the case with many Brazilian wineries, Salton was established by emigrants from Northern Italy who came to the Serra Gaucha wine region. In this case it was the year 1878, when Antonio Domenico Salton, came to Brazil to seek his fortune. Like many emigrants, he planted grapes and made home wine, but established Salton Winery much earlier than others – in 1910, with the support of his seven sons.

Today Salton produces 25 million liters of wine and makes 60 to 70 different labels. They purchase 70% of their grapes from local grape growers, but also own 50 hectares of their own vines in Serra Gaucha and another 115 hectares further south in the Campanha region. They employ 500 workers and export their wine to 24 different countries.

The winery headquarters is just outside of town, and is a very large impressive white stucco building with mosaics inside and out. In the front is a small demonstration vineyard.  The winery offers daily tours and tastings for visitors.

Linkage to Scotland

When I asked Gregorio the origin of the name, Salton, he replied that it was a small town in the middle of Scotland. Definitely not an Italian name, he thought that perhaps his ancestors from Italy had married into a family from Salton.  Regardless the name Salton is great name for a winery, being that it is easy to spell, pronounce and remember. An intriguing question is – how many people in Scotland are buying Salton wine from Brazil?

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Salton Winery Visitor’s Center and Wine Shop

How to Make Sparkling Charmant in Brazil

Gregorio and Cesar, International Relations Manager (see photo below), took us on a tour of the very large and impressive cellars. We traversed a catwalk winding through a forest of massive stainless steel tanks where the majority of the sparkling wine is produced.  Gregorio explained how they produce their sparkling charmant, which is a different method from secondary fermentation in bottle (Method Champenoise), because the second fermentation takes place in a large tank.  This is a faster process, and the way that much Prosecco is produced (though some high-end Prosecco uses second fermentation in bottle).  In fact, Salton does produce a “Prosecco” made with the Glera grape, just as is still done in northern Italy. This is the process they use:

  1. Harvest the grapes early at lower brix so they are fresh.
  2. Destem and then press as whole cluster
  3. Transfer 60% of the pressed juice to stainless steel tank for a 1-2day cold stabilization.
  4. Transfer to new stainless steel tank, add selected yeast with a neutral character and ferment at 16 degrees Celsius for 7 to 10 days. No malolactic fermentation.
  5. Clarify the still wine with filters and centrifuge.
  6. Create blend – may use still wine from an older vintage (making NV) or can also produce vintage charmant.
  7. Transfer to new stainless steel tank; add yeast, sugar and nutrients for secondary fermentation in tank to create bubbles. Leave space at top of tank, and keep temperature at 10 – 12 C.
  8. Continued secondary fermentation for 1, 3, 6, or 12 months, depending on style and price point of the charmant being produced.
  9. Add dosage to tank and stir before bottling.
  10. Lower temperature to zero degrees for bottling.

Wine Tasting at Salton Winery

After the tour, we were escorted to a private tasting room where we tasted nine different Salton wines, beginning with three charmants and then six still wines.  Following are the highlights from the tasting:

  • Salton Natural Brut Sparkling Rose NV – Fresh and fruity with strawberry, watermelon and crisp lime notes (charmant method). 88 points
  • Salton Sparkling Reserva Ouro NV – A complex cuvee with creamy mouthfeel and citrus and nutty notes. Made from chardonnay, pinot noir and Riesling. Aged 12 month sur lie with battonage, but still made in charmant method. Quite impressive. 90 points.
  • Salton Marselan Intenso 2016 – oozing with blueberry and mocha; rich and satisfying – amazingly no oak! Delicious.  91 points

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Charcuterie & Charmant in a Magical Cave before Departure

At the end of the tasting, Cesar surprised us, by leading us down a staircase to a dark cellar with many tunnels leading in different directions. We wound through the tunnels, which were filled with Gregorian music of chanting monks and beautiful angel statues in different corners. It was quite enchanting, and Cesar said that tourists loved it.  So did I!

Eventually the tunnel opened into a stone room with a fireplace, and a large round table with an inlaid geometric design. It reminded me of the round table of the Knights of King Arthur and Queen Guinevere. Sitting on the table was a large platter of charcuterie, which we were invited to enjoy along with another glass of delicious sparkling Salton charmant.  As we raised our glasses in a toast, I thought it was a great way to conclude our magnificent tour of Salton Winery.

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Lidio Carraro Winery – Boutique Producer of Pure Natural Wines from Brazil

(June 2018) If you enjoy visiting small boutique wineries where you are invited to taste wine in the family home, then Lidio Carraro Winery in the Serra Gaucha wine region of Brazil is for you. Even better is the fact that Lidio Carraro is the Brazilian leader in producing natural wines, based on their purist philosophy of winemaking with no additives, no filtration and not even any wood on red wines! The result is fresh and delicious wines with distinctive personality.

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A Visit to Lidio Carraro WInery in Southern Brazil

Background of Lidio Carraro

The Carraro family emigrated from the Veneto region of Italy in 1875 to Bento Gonçalves, in the heart of Brazilian wine country. For many years the family grew and sold grapes, but in the 1990’s, Mr. Lidio Carraro decided to focus on cool climate Merlot with a vision to produce very high quality low-interventionist wine. Soon the whole family was involved, with sons Juliano and Giovanni involved in winemaking and daughter Patricia and Mama Carraro devoted to marketing and hospitality. With this dynamic family team, Lidio Carraro Winery launched in 2001, inviting customers to visit them in their small charming home to taste wines.

Today Lidio Carraro produces around 400,000 bottles per year, and exports wine to 28 countries. They sustainably farm 8 hectares of vineyards in Serra Gaucha and another 50 hectares of vineyards further south in the Serra do Sudeste wine region. They have six tiers of wine, beginning with the entry level Faces brand, to the mid-priced Agnus, Dadivas and Elos labels, and culminating with the luxury tier of Singular and Great Harvest – only produced in the best years. Styles and varietals ranges from sparkling, cool-climate merlot, chardonnay, pinot noir, tempranillo, malbec, teroldego, nebbiolo, and tannat.

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Wine Tasting at Lidio Carrano Winery

“I Don’t Want to Make Coca-Cola Wine”

So how did Lidio Carraro become the leader in Purist Natural Wine in Brazil? According to daughter, Patricia Carraro, who welcomed us to their small charming home to taste wine, “In the 1990’s my father, Lidio, became upset with the types of wines that were being made globally.  He called them Coca-Cola wines and said he didn’t want to produce wines that all tasted the same.” Therefore, the family decided to adopt a very purist philosophy, similar to what was being made in northern Italy in the 1800’s.

Today this purist philosophy fits perfectly into the “natural wine movement,” because Lidio Carraro produces their wines in a very natural fashion.  The vines are farmed organically with all work done by hand. Grapes are picked by parcel and fermented with natural yeast. There is no fining, filtering, or additions, and all wines are aged without oak. This results in wines with very pure fruit and earthy notes, and sometimes with the slightly cloudy texture that is desirable in natural wines. Each vintage is unique, and so the wines exhibit the influence of each year’s distinctive climate.

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The Carrano Family in their Vineyard. Photo Credit: LC Website

A Team of Powerful Wine Women

Though I have visited wineries all over the world, and have received extremely friendly welcomes, I must admit that Lidio Carraro was one of the friendliest wineries I’ve ever encountered. As I walked up the short flight of stairs to the old family home and into the living room, which was set up as an informal tasting salon, I was literally welcomed with open arms by four women. These included Mama Carraro, daughter Patricia, Export Manager, Monica, and Hospitality Manager, Leticia. They proceeded to entertain us with stories of the winery, their travels, and a fabulous line-up of wines to taste.

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A Warm Welcome from the Lidio Carrano Team

I was extremely impressed with the overflowing passion and enthusiasm of Patricia Carraro, as she described the deep symbolism that was expressed in the logo of the winery and the individual names of the wines:

“Our logo is a bunch of grapes in the shape of Brazil,” she explained tracing her fingers over the delicate Lidio Carrano logo, “and the red color is to express the life blood of wine and the beat of passion in our hearts.”

“The name of each wine is also very relevant,” she continued. “For example, our Dadivas line, comes from the Latin ‘Da Divas ‘and means “a gift from heaven’ and ‘to celebrate life.’”

Highlights from the Tasting

We tasted through a delicious selection of very unique wines. Following are some of my favorites:

  • Dadivas Espumante Brut Lidio Carraro NV – a 100% chardonnay with tart apple, lemon and yeasty notes. The official sparkling wine of the World Cup in Brazil.  Refreshing. 90 points
  • Faces Rose of Pinot Noir Lidio Carrano 2016 – a beautiful pale pink rose with soft strawberry, zippy citrus and a slight yeasty note. Lovely. 89 points
  • Lidio Carrano Merlot 2011 Grand Harvest – a superpower of a merlot with dark plum, chocolate, herbs, and structured tannins. Very complex and long. 94 points
  • Lidio Carrano Quorum 2008 Grand Harvest – masterfully crafted red blend of merlot and cabernet sauvignon, with complex black cassis, anise, forest floor and fine-grained tannins. It is pretty difficult to believe that there is absolutely no oak in this wine! 93 points

Miolo Winery – One of the Most Beautiful Wineries in Brazil

(June 2018) The first view of Miolo Winery almost takes your breath away. It seems like a fairytale winery with its impressive gates and tall tower, all nestled amongst flowing vineyards and sleeping mountains filled with fog. I took this photo of Miolo Winery from my hotel room on the first morning of my visit to Brazilian wine country. Since I arrived late at night, I had no idea what I would see when I opened the curtains in the morning, but this was the view. At the time, I didn’t know it was Miolo Winery, but was very pleased to learn I would visit it the following day.

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Miolo Winery in Southern Brazil, Serra Gaucha Wine Region

Miolo does not disappoint, because it is a very professional winery, ranked as one of the largest in Brazil. Due to its size, Miolo produces a wide variety of wine, ranging from high-end luxury brands, to mid-priced premium, and entry-level wines. They make a wine for every pocket book. Indeed their tasting room is packed with visitors everyday, who arrive on buses to enjoy winery tours and tastings, thus allowing Miolo to achieve over 300,000 wine tourists per year.

The View from the Top of Miolo Tower

We were welcomed to Miolo by Anderson Tirloni, Export Manager, who provided a tour of the facilities beginning with an elevator ride to the top of the tower. The view of the vast property with picnic ground and lake was very impressive. So were the demonstration vineyards, which included a wide variety of different grape varietals for visitors to examine.

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View of Miolo Grounds from Top of Tower

Impressive Winemaking Facilities

Due to its large size, the winemaking facilities at Miolo are quite expansive. We donned protective clothing, including head covers and smocks for the tour, but I don’t think we would have won any fashion competitions (see photo). I was especially impressed with the size of the laboratory, where we met one of the enologists.

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Dressed to Tour Miolo Winemaking Facility

Altogether Miolo farms over 1200 hectares of vineyards and produces around 15 million liters of wine per year. They have four different winemaking facilities, and multiple winemakers. Michel Rolland has been a consulting winemaker in the past. Miolo also owns the old Almaden winery that was established in Brazil in the 1970’s. They continue to produce some of the original brands from that facility.

Expansive Tasting of Miolo Wines

Anderson had organized a large tasting of Miolo wines, which allowed us to understand the wide range of their wine brands and styles. Some of my favorites included:

  • Miolo Milliseme Brut 2008 – a beautifully crafted sparkling wine with ripe apple, toast, creamy persistent mousse, crisp acidity, and a touch of minerality. Chardonnay and pinot noir made in the traditional method – 90 points
  • Miolo Quinta do Seival Portuguese Blend 2015 – a blend of Tinta Roriz and Touriga Nacional. Black in color with mixed dark berries, spice, tobacco, cedar, and violets. Concentrated and complex – 91 points
  • Miolo Cuvee Giuspepe Red Blend 2015 – A blend of cabernet sauvignon and merlot aged in 100% new French oak. Richly textured with ripe cassis, red plum, and tobacco – 92 points

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